The Troy Street Observer

Floyd Williams: “No Hobbies. Just Music.”

Boston-born Floyd Williams had a long career in jazz, first as a musician and then as an educator. In his home town, the drummer was known by his nickname, “Floogie.” No one around now knows how he got it. Later in his career, people knew him as Floyd Williams.

Head shot of Floyd "Floogie" Williams
Floyd “Floogie” Williams

His Boston story is an intriguing one. As with many artists of past decades who did not achieve great stardom in New York, there are facts about his story we don’t know. We do know he attended Boston public schools, started on piano as a boy, switched to the drums, gigged with friends while still at Roxbury High School, and studied briefly at the New England Conservatory. I have read that Johnny Hodges was his godfather, and I am still looking into that.

Legendary godfather or not, Floogie Williams earned his own recognition as a drummer in the late 1940s, at a time when Boston was incubating an exciting brand of modern jazz. The numerous G.I. Bill students at the music schools were mixing with the local musicians in the clubs clustered around Mass Ave and Columbus Ave. Disc jockey Symphony Sid Torin called this intersection “the jazz corner of Boston.” Williams was a regular on the bandstand at the Sunnyside Cafe, where he worked with saxophonists Sam Rivers and Gigi Gryce. He also played occasionally in the big band of Jimmie Martin, where he met trumpeters Joe Gordon and Lennie Johnson, and Jaki Byard—who played trombone!

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Feb 25, 1915: Violinist, Saxophonist Ray Perry Born

Violinist and saxophonist Ray Perry, one of the great doublers of jazz, was born in Boston.

One of three jazz-playing brothers from Harrishof Street (Joe played tenor and Bey played drums), Ray Perry started as a violinist and took up the alto saxophone at age 20. He organized his first band, the Arabian Knights, in 1932. He worked with Dean Earl in the Little Harlem Orchestra in 1936-37, and there, noted Gunther Schuller in his book, The Swing Era, “In the mid-thirties (Perry) developed a technique of simultaneously singing and bowing, singing an octave below his playing. Slam Stewart, the bass player, heard Perry and adopted the same technique, except in inversion: singing an octave above his playing.”

Ray Perry with Ken Club ad
Ray Perry with Ken Club advertisement

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