The Troy Street Observer

Dean Earl: “The Original Dean”

Photo of Dean Earl
Dean Earl, mid-1950s. Photo New England Jazz Alliance

It’s time to mark a centennial. Everett G. Earl was born on April 10, 1914, in Corona, Queens, and years later he said he couldn’t recall a time when he wasn’t playing the piano. He was mainly self-taught but he had big ears; he grew up in the New York City of James P. Johnson and Willie the Lion, and by age 13 he knew enough stride piano to play at rent parties and YMCA dances.

By age 17 Earl was already on the road, traveling  as far west as St. Louis on the RKO Theatre circuit. During his Boston stops, he stayed at the Railway Club on Yarmouth Street, a combination rooming house and speakeasy, where the jazz was quite good. In 1933, the Railway Club asked Earl to stay on as the resident piano man, and he did—thus becoming one of the first, if not the first, jazz musician to move from New York to Boston rather than the other way around. In 1934 Earl joined Joe Nevils’s Alabama Aces, and after that went to Eddie Levine’s nightclub, Little Harlem, on Mass Ave.

In 1936 Earl organized an eight-piece group to work at Little Harlem. Its members included Ray Perry, doubling on reeds and violin; alto saxist Jackie Fields, who in 1939 would play on the legendary “Body and Soul” recording of Coleman Hawkins; and bassist Slam Stewart, then a student at the Boston Conservatory. “The Boston musicians liked to play with me because I had that New York feel,” Earl later recalled.

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Feb 25, 1915: Violinist, Saxophonist Ray Perry Born

Violinist and saxophonist Ray Perry, one of the great doublers of jazz, was born in Boston.

One of three jazz-playing brothers from Harrishof Street (Joe played tenor and Bey played drums), Ray Perry started as a violinist and took up the alto saxophone at age 20. He organized his first band, the Arabian Knights, in 1932. He worked with Dean Earl in the Little Harlem Orchestra in 1936-37, and there, noted Gunther Schuller in his book, The Swing Era, “In the mid-thirties (Perry) developed a technique of simultaneously singing and bowing, singing an octave below his playing. Slam Stewart, the bass player, heard Perry and adopted the same technique, except in inversion: singing an octave above his playing.”

Ray Perry with Ken Club ad
Ray Perry with Ken Club advertisement

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